Current Course Offerings

FALL 2018

Undergraduate Courses

 

“Modern” Poetry and Poetics: Baudelaire to the “Present”

COM 422 / ENG 423 / GER 422 / FRE 422

Claudia Joan Brodsky

W 1:30-4:20pm

 

Designed for both undergraduates and graduate students, this course will focus on reading major “modern” poets and writings on poetics, in French, German, English and Spanish, with additional readings in theory of modernity, poetry, and the arts written by several of the poets we read. These include: Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Rilke, Celan, Garcia Lorca, Pax, Borges, Stevens, Bishop and Ashbery. Secondary readings will include essays by major theorists and critics who consider the larger questions of representation, temporality, visuality, and language underlying poetic practice.

 

 

Modern Poetry

ENG 362

Joshua Kotin

MW 7:30-8:50pm

 

This seminar will introduce students to English-language poetry from the first half of the twentieth century. The seminar aims to balance the study of major poets with an investigation of key movements and poetry communities. The seminar will also attend to controversies that defined modern poetry and modernism, more generally–controversies concerning aesthetic difficulty, tradition, fascism and communism, gender, race, and the role of poetry in public discourse.

 

 

Topics in Poetry: Poetry and Belief

ENG 405

Jeff Dolven

W 6:00-8:30pm

 

What does it mean to believe a poem? To believe in a poem? Can a poem itself have, or carry, beliefs–moral, religious, political, scientific? We often take poetry to be a space of ambiguity and play, where certainty is suspended, but it is also a uniquely powerful form of speech, and has long been used for credos, manifestos, prayers. These are the questions of our seminar, questions we will pursue with the help both of poets (Milton, Dickinson, Moten) and philosophers (Popper, Ricoeur, Anscombe). The seminar will move back and forth between poetry of past and present, between the beliefs of others and our own.

 

 

Chaucer

ENG 312 MED312

Andrew Cole

Th 1:30-4:20pm

 

You study Geoffrey Chaucer not because he’s “olde” or “hilaaarious,” nor because he taught Spenser and Shakespeare a thing or two about poetry. You study Chaucer because almost every challenge we face today–so, too, every morsel of our species-being we either loathe or love–was expressed in his works but in forms different enough to help us get out of our heads to think honestly about what beleaguers human societies. Chaucer will teach us about violence, religion, law, class, identity, sex, love, laughter, and language in the fourteenth century, and we will reflect on what his brilliantly crafted works tell us about life.

 

 

Forms of Literature: Love Poems

ENG 402

T 1:30-4:30pm

Susan Stewart

 

In this seminar, we will explore the composition and reception of poems to and from lovers and poems “about” love from Ancient Greece to the twentieth-century. Our focus will be upon earlier, paradigm-setting, examples of the form. We will be asking who is talking and who is listening in a love poem, how conventions of love poetry develop and are overturned, and whether or not the concept and expression of love have certain continuities across eras.

 

Intermediate Latin: Catullus and His Age

LAT 105

Melissa Haynes

MTWTh (various times)

 

This course aims at increasing facility in reading Latin prose and poetry and introduces students to the literary culture of Republican Rome. We shall read selections from two important authors of the late Roman Republic, Caesar and Catullus.

 

 

The Lyric Age of Greece

CLG 308

Barbara Graziosi

MW 11am-12:20pm

 

 

Students will read, in the original Greek, the works of the great lyric poets of archaic Greece, with the exception of Pindar and Bacchylides. The main surviving fragments of Alcman, Archilochus, Callinus, Tyrtaeus, Sappho, Alcaeus, Stesichorus, Semonides, Solon, Mimnermus, Theognis, Ibycus, Anacreon, Simonides, and Hipponax will be considered in detail. Special emphasis will be placed on new discoveries, the challenges of accurate and expressive translation, and the broader literary, cultural and historical contexts in which the lyric poets created their works and in which, in turn, those works were received.

 

 

 

 

Creative Writing Poetry CWR 201

Michael Dickman, Alex Dimitrov, Alicia Ostriker, Patrick Rosal, Erika Sanchez, Susan Wheeler, Monica Youn

Advanced Creative Writing Poetry  CWR 301

Susan Wheeler, Michael Dickman

Various Times

 

Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts.

 

 

Graduate Courses

 

Readings in Chinese Literature: Tang Poetry

EAS 534

Anna Shields

M 1:30-4:20pm

 

Seminar explores the poetry of the Tang dynasty from the early period through the end of the dynasty. We focus on the topics and occasions of Tang poetry and read important works by poets in every major period. Primary text reading is accompanied by secondary scholarship in English, Chinese, Japanese, and French.

 

 

Classical Japanese Poetics

EAS 543

M 1:30-4:20pm

Brian Steininger

 

Reading of poetic works from pre-Meiji Japan together with an introduction to relevant topics including: commentaries and reception, book history and manuscript transmission, historical and social background, and the use of modern reference tools.

 

 

Poetics: Intersections: Whitman & Dickinson

ENG 563

Sharon Cameron

Th 9:00-11:50am

 

An examination of the formal, conceptual, and philosophical innovations in the work of the two major nineteenth-century American poets. We consider such topics as the tropes of body and mind in Whitman’s and Dickinson’s verse; the revision fundamental to each poet’s “development”; and the premises behind Whitman’s poetry of wholes (nothing left out) and Dickinson’s poetry of fragments. How does Whitman reconcile the construction of an abstract, inclusive, universal self with his commitment to substantive particulars? How does Dickinson find a language for the off-the-map quality of private experience?

 

 

Major Russian Poets and Poetic Movements – Symbolism

SLA 518

Michael A. Wachtel

T 1:30-4:20pm

 

A survey of the major Symbolists. While poetry is the primary emphasis, attention is also given to philosophical works (most notably of Vl.Solov’ev), theoretical essays (of Bryusov, Bely, Ivanov) and the novel (Bely, Sologub).

 

 

 

 

 

SPRING 2018

 

COM 335/ ECS 336 /ENG 435/ GER 336 Poetries of Resistance

W 1:30-4:20pm

Michael Wood, Sandra Bermann

 

Poetry can be seen as a mode of reflection on history and, very often, as an act of resistance to it. This course will examine works written in Europe, Latin America and the US during the 20th and 21st centuries in different languages and historical contexts. We will explore their oppositional and also their liberatory effects: their ability to evoke their times, to disrupt our usual understandings while offering new political, artistic and ethical perspectives. The course will pay special attention to the work of René Char and Paul Celan, as ideal points of focus for questions of language and resistance.

 

 

COM 542 / GSS 542 / SPO 501 / ENG 542   Women and Liberation: Feminist Poetics and

Politics in the Americas (1960s to the present)

W 1:30-4:30pm

Susana Draper

 

This course aims to explore different forms that the question of liberation has taken in writings by women philosophers and poets whose work helped to create cultural and political movements in the U.S. and Latin America. Starting in the 1960s, the course touches upon different philosophical concepts and poetic figures that have shaped the language of women’s struggles (intersectionality, black and third world feminism, subalternity and feminist epistemologies, capitalist accumulation and “witch”-hunting, (re)transmission of knowledge).

 

 

ENG 325 Milton

TTh 1:30-2:20pm

Russell Leo

 

We will explore John Milton’s entire career, largely as poet, but also as dramatist, prose writer and thinker: a lifelong effort to unite the aims of intellectual, political and literary experimentation. In doing so Milton made himself the most influential non-dramatic poet in the English language. We will spend much time with Paradise Lost, regarded by many as the greatest non-dramatic poem in English or any modern language, and which has extensive debt to drama. We will encounter Milton’s profound, extensive learning and his startling innovations with words, songs and in ideas of personal, domestic and communal liberty.

 

 

ENG 341 The Later Romantics

TTh 11:00am-12:20pm

Susan Wolfson

The flamboyant second generation of British Romantics: Keats, Percy Shelley, Mary Shelley, Byron, Hemans, Austen. Careful attention to texts–ranging from novels, to odes, to romances, and modern epics–in historical and cultural contexts, with primary focus on literary imagination.

 

ENG 414 Major Author(s): Wallace Stevens

M 1:30-4:20pm

Susan Stewart

This is a seminar for those who would like to get to know the work of the vital Modernist poet Wallace Stevens well. We will read most of Stevens’s Collected Poetry and Prose from the Library of America edition and will draw on other readings from philosophy, the theory of painting, and European modernism and from his American contemporaries, particularly Marianne Moore and William Carlos Williams.

 

 

ENG 563 Jointed Lyrics: Narrative, Bundle, Canon

Bradin Cormack

T 9:00-11:50am

 

How do lyrics come to belong to a larger whole, whether through narration or collection or canon formation? The class considers, including from the perspective of narrative theory, some early modern sonnet sequences written in the Petrarchan tradition, as well the material history of lyric collections in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. In a third and final section of the class, we consider the impact of earlier poets on some poets working in the twentieth century, as a way of thinking about official and personal canons.

 

 

ENG 200 Introduction to English Literature: 14th to 18th Century

TTh 11–11:50am

Russell J. Leo
Donald Vance Smith

 

An introduction to the leading figures of earlier English Literature, including Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, and Swift; to literary history as a mode of inquiry; and to some of the questions that preoccupy English poetry, prose, and drama across four centuries: art, beauty, romance, desire, the will, the mind, God, sex, and death.

 

 

ENG 363 Virtual Victorians

MW 11am-12:20pm

Meredith A. Martin

 

Are you reading this on a screen? Technology changes how we read, but that has always been the case. In the 19th century, print technology changed the way readers experienced texts; today, technology lets us access 19th-century texts in new ways. How do digital projects reimagine literature as data and metadata? How do we decide what to preserve? We’ll explore the print culture of the 19th century, learn techniques of close and distant reading, and think about how people and computers are  taught to read poems. No prior experience with digital humanities tools or poetry required.

 

 

AAS 510 / REL 515   Race, Religion, and the Harlem Renaissance

W 1:30-4:20pm

Wallace D. Best

The Harlem Renaissance (HR) of the 1920s is most often depicted as “the flowering of African American arts and literature.” It can also be characterized as a period when diverse forms of African American religious expressions, ideologies, and institutions emerged. This course explores the literature of the Harlem Renaissance, particularly the writings of Langston Hughes, to understand the pivotal intersection of race and religion during this time of black “cultural production.”

 

 

AAS459/ ENG 366 African American Literature: Harlem Renaissance to Present

MW 1:30-2:50pm

Kinohi Nishikawa

 

A survey of twentieth- and twenty-first century African American literature, including the tradition’s key aesthetic manifestos. Special attention to how modern African American literature is periodized and why certain innovations in genre and style emerged when they did. Poetry, essays, novels, popular fiction, a stage production or two, and related visual texts.

 

 

AAS 242 / ENG 242 / GSS 242 / LAS 242  Other Futures: An Introduction to Modern Caribbean Literature

MW MW 3-4:20pm

Nijah Cunningham

 

This course introduces students to major theories and debates within the study of Caribbean literature and culture with a particular focus on the idea of catastrophe. Reading novels and poetry that address the historical loss and injustices that have given shape to the modern Caribbean, we will explore questions of race, gender, and sexuality and pay considerable attention to the figure of the black body caught in the crosscurrents of a catastrophic history. We will analyze how writers and artists attempted to construct alternative images of the future from the histories of slavery and colonialism that haunt the Caribbean and its diasporas.

 

 

CLA 505 Greek Lyric Poetry

T 9:00-11:50am

Deborah T. Steiner

 

This seminar acquaints students with the language and poetics of early Greek lyric (iambic, elegiac and ‘lyric’ proper), with a particular focus on the composers of iambics and monodic and choral lyric. Through close readings of individual works, we address questions of genre and performance/re-performance, orality and literacy, poetic polemics and uses and re-workings of the hexameter tradition, and the particular occasions for which the poems were designed. We also contextualize the compositions within their social, political and historical milieus. Visual material is additionally included.

 

 

CLG 108 Homer

MTWTH 11-:11:50am

Joshua Billings

 

Introduction to Homeric dialect, oral poetry, and meter; discussion of literary technique, historical background to the epics, and Homer’s role in the development of Greek thought.

 

 

LAT 108 The Origins of Rome: Livy and Vergil

MTWTh 9-9:50am,  or 12:30-1:20pm

Daniela E. Mairhofer

 

We will read selections from Livy and Vergil, the masters of prose and poetry respectively in the period of Augustus. Our objectives are: to develop the ability to read Latin with greater ease and enjoyment; to improve sight-reading skills; to experience the artistry of Latin prose and poetry; and to examine some of the questions associated with the Romans’ interpretation of their history.

 

 

CLA 538 Latin Poetry of the Empire – Lucan and Post Virgilian Epic

W 9:00-11:50am

Denis Feeney

 

We study the epics of Lucan and Statius as successors to and competitors with Virgil’s Aeneid. Main themes include civil war, history and myth, and the contemporary relevance of epic.

 

 

CWR 316 / AAS 336 / LAO 316 / ASA 316

Special Topics in Poetry: Race, Identity and Innovation

W 1:30pm-4:20pm

Monica Youn

 

This workshop explores the link between racial identity and poetic innovation in work by contemporary poets of color. Experimental or avant-garde poetry in the American literary tradition has often defined itself as “impersonal,” “against expression” or “post-identity.” Unfortunately, this mindset has tended to exclude or downplay poems that engage issues of racial identity. This course explores works where poets of color have treated racial identity as a means to destabilize literary ideals of beauty, mastery and the autonomy of the text while at the same time engaging in poetic practices that subvert conceptions of identity or authenticity.

 

 

CWR 202 Creative Writing Poetry

Michael Dickman, Terrance Hayes, James Richardson, Susan Wheeler, Monica Youn

 

Practice in the original composition of poetry supplemented by the reading and analysis of standard works. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student’s growth as both creator and reader of literature. This class is open to beginning and intermediate students by application.

 

 

CWR 302 Creative Writing Poetry (Advanced)

Mark Doty, Paul Muldoon

 

Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts.

 

 

CWR 315 Life is Short, Art is Really Short

M 1:30-4:20pm

James Richardson

 

All literature is short – compared to our lives, anyway – but we’ll be concentrating on poetry and prose at their very shortest. The reading will include proverbs, aphorisms, greguerias, one-line poems, riddles, jokes, fragments, haiku, epigrams and microlyrics. Imagism, contemporary shortists, prose poems, various longer works assembled from small pieces, and possibly even flash fiction. Students will take away from the thrift and edge of these literary microorganisms a new sense of what can be left out of your work and new ideas about how those nebulae of pre-draft in your notebooks might condense into stars and constellations.

 

 

 

EAS 371 / COM 375 / HUM 372 Love and Violence through Words: Modern Chinese Literature in the Age of Revolution

W 1:30-4:20pm

Guangchen Chen

 

This course will introduce you to important works in modern Chinese literature from late 19th century to the present, which have served as tools of propaganda, national defense, cultural revolution, self-fashioning, gender-conscious communication, or complete depoliticization. Therefore, the multiple literary genres of novel, folklore tale, theater and poetry will be analyzed against related forms of film, opera, music-drama and painting. Our reading of the texts will be set in the context of the turbulent twentieth century, through which you will also gain a comprehensive understanding of the critical moments in modern Chinese history.

 

EAS 232 Introduction to Chinese Literature

TTh 3-4:20pm

Anna Shields

 

An introduction to some of the most important texts, writers, and topics of Classical Literature from antiquity through the Song dynasty. All readings are in English, and no previous background in Chinese or Asian culture is required. Topics include: nature of the Chinese language; the beginnings of poetry; development of narrative and historical writing; classical Chinese poetics; literature of protest, dissent, and political satire; love poetry; religious and philosophical ideas in Chinese literature.

 

 

FRE 525 20th Century French Poetry or Theater- French Modernist Poetry

W 1:30-4:20pm

Efthymia Rentzou 

 

This course investigates Modernist poetics in France from mid-19th to mid-20th c. and seeks to re-evaluate Modernism in French literary history. Course treats the topic at a variety of interrelated levels by exploring French poetry as part of the broad historical phenomenon of Modernism, while examining the specific ways it materialized in France as formal innovation and as response to modernity. Seminal poets such as Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Apollinaire, and Cendrars, are discussed as well as specific movements. Readings and theoretical questions also address the complex relationship between avant-garde and Modernism.

 

SLA514 Pushkin

T 1:30-4:20pm

Michael A. Wachtel

 

An analysis of Pushkin’s major works in all genres (lyric poetry, narrative poetry, dramatic works, prose, novel in verse, etc.). Some attention is given to Pushkin scholarship, both Russian (Tomashevsky, Tynyanov, Lotman) and American (Bethea, Sandler, Todd).

 

Fall 2017

ENG 405 (LA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Topics in Poetry – Contemporary Poetry

Joshua I. Kotin 

This seminar focuses exclusively on books of poetry published in 2017. We will read work by established and emerging poets, and attend poetry readings in Princeton (and possibly New York and Philadelphia). Poets will also visit the class to discuss their work and/or the work of writers they admire. Students will write reviews, rather than essays, and, in the process, learn about (and contribute to) the institutions that support and promote contemporary writing.

 

ENG 381 (LA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Laughter, Vice and Delusion: Satire and Satirists, 1500-1700

Rhodri Lewis 

This seminar considers a part of English literary history that is often overlooked: the surge in satirical writing from 1500 to 1700. In it, we will discuss a range of texts–prose, poetry, and drama–that are funny, clever, angry, culturally omniverous, and often foul mouthed. In addition to enjoying ourselves, we will see that satire involves far more than calling out corruption in high places, or mocking the pretensions of snobs, lovers, bad writers, and those trying to make it big. It is also a provocation to laugh, and sometimes to wince, our way to a better understanding of what life and literature are supposed to be about.

 

ENG 563   No Pass/D/Fail

Poetics – Poetic Realism: Episodes, 18th Century to the Present

Frances C. Ferguson 

The leading ambition is to track a variety of ways in which poetry tries to capture felt and pressing realities. The course starts with Pope at his most sweeping (“Essay on Man,” “Essay on Criticism”), and take up the relationship among psalms, metrical psalms, blank verse, Anna Laetitia Barbauld’s metrical prose, and hymns before proceeding to georgics and conversation poems. It concludes with a discussion of first-person lyric and memoir.

 

ENG 523   No Pass/D/Fail

Renaissance Drama – Shakespeare’s Language

Jeff Dolven 

A survey of Shakespeare’s linguistic resources, from several standpoints: the history of the language, the art of rhetoric, problems of attribution (including the potentials of computational stylometrics), and poetics. Over the course of the semester we study six plays, including Comedy of Errors, Hamlet, and The Winter’s Tale. There are weekly exercises in stylistic description and imitation. Our questions: how does Shakespeare sound like himself? (Does he sound like himself?) How does he sound like others, like his age, like his readers? And his characters – can we ask the same questions of them?

 

LAT 105   na, npdf

Intermediate Latin: Catullus and His Age

Melissa Haynes 

This course aims at increasing facility in reading Latin prose and poetry and introduces students to the literary culture of Republican Rome. We shall read selections from two important authors of the late Roman Republic, Caesar and Catullus.

 

MUS 307 / HUM 307 / ENG 313 (LA)   No Pass/D/Fail

The Irish Oral Tradition

Iarla Ó Lionáird 

Story, song and the written word share a common and ancient heritage in the Irish Tradition. In this seminar series we will explore the rich tapestry that comprises the written word in Irish Language Literature and Song and examine how oral forms of artistic expression continue to enrich a nation’s literature and music to this very day. The series will explore the shared histories of Irish Language Poetry and the Sean Nós song tradition, how oral culture finds expression in Irish Theatre and how older oralities still find potent representation and viability in a wide span of contemporary Music Culture, from Opera to Traditional Music.

 

FRE 403 / AFS 403 / LAS 412 (LA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Topics in Francophone Literature, Culture, and History – Aimé Césaire

Nick Nesbitt 

This course will study a selection of the writings of Aimé Césaire, a towering figure of the 20th century in poetry, theatre, and postcolonial critique and politics. Césaire’s poetry is arguably the most accomplished oeuvre of any anticolonial poet of the century, and a pinnacle of modernist French poetry tout court. Similarly, Césaire’s theatrical works are outstanding moments in the creation of a theatre of decolonization, while his celebrated critical pieces, such as the “Discours sur le colonialisme”, articulate the ethical and political grounds for the struggle to end colonialism.

 

ITA 303 / MED 303 (LA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Dante’s “Inferno”

Simone Marchesi 

Intensive study of the “Inferno”, with major attention paid to poetic elements such as structure, allegory, narrative technique, and relation to earlier literature, principally the Latin classics. Course conducted in English with highly interactive classes and preceptorials. An Italian precept will be offered.

 

LAT 333 (LA)   na, npdf

Vergil’s Aeneid

Denis Feeney 

This course will develop an understanding of Virgil’s poetic and stylistic techniques (metre, allusion, structure, word order), together with an understanding of Roman history and identity at the end of the Republic.

 

LCA 213 / AAS 213 / ENG 213 / HUM 213 (LA)   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

The Lucid Black and Proud Musicology of Leroi Jones/Amiri Baraka

Gregory S. Tate 

This class will focus on the career-long writing about jazz, blues, rock and R&B of Amiri Baraka (nee Leroi Jones) and the significant impact it has had on cultural politics, scholarship and esthetics from the early 1960s to the present. Baraka’s work as an activist and his gifts as a poet/novelist/playwright/political essayist allowed him to inject considerable lyricism, eloquence, learning and passion into the previously moribund fields of African American music history and journalism. His music writing also affected the tenor of future public advocacy for jazz via the NEA ‘s Jazz Masters awards and Jazz At Lincoln Center.

 

EAS 533   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Readings in Chinese Literature – Prose and Poetry of the Northern Song

Anna M. Shields 

This course surveys Northern Song poetry and prose, focusing on new styles and genres appearing in the 11th century. Genres include: regulated verse; song lyrics; remarks on poetry (shihua); essays; travel writing; funerary texts. Authors include Ouyang Xiu, Mei Yaochen, Su Shi, Huang Tingjian, Yan Shu, Liu Yong, Wang Anshi, Sima Guang. Secondary scholarship in Chinese, Japanese, and English will focus on genres and writers. We consider Song literature in the framework of Chinese literary history, the discursive nature of Song poetry, aesthetics of song lyrics, and new prose styles.

 

EAS 531   Graded A-F, P/D/F, Audit

Chinese Literature – The Verses of Chu (Chuci)

Martin Kern 

Through close readings of original sources, we analyze the anthology of the Verses of Chu (Chuci) in its poetic, historical, and hermeneutic dimensions. Drawing on a wider range of early historical, literary, and philosophical texts, we contextualize the songs in late Warring States and early Han literary and intellectual culture. In addition, we trace the anthology’s poetic reception in medieval times as well as its history of scholarship from the Han Dynasty to the present.

 

COM 310 / MED 308 (LA)   No Pass/D/Fail

The Literature of Medieval Europe

Daniel Heller-Roazen 

An introduction to medieval literature and the question of performative language in literature, linguistics, philosophy and theology. Works to be read include romance and lyric poetry from the French, German and English traditions, as well as selections from Scholastic philosophy, grammar and theology. We will also study some twentieth-century philosophical and linguistic accounts of speech acts. Topics to be discussed include lies, promises, oaths, baptisms, ritual speech and the structure of sacraments. All texts will be read in translation, though study of the originals will be encouraged whenever possible.

 

CWR 201 (LA)   P/D/F Only

Creative Writing (Poetry)

Michael C. Dickman 
James Richardson 
Erika L. Sanchez 
Susan Wheeler 
Monica Y. Youn 

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Practice in the original composition of poetry supplemented by the reading and analysis of standard works. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student’s growth as both creator and reader of literature. This class is open to beginning and intermediate students by application.

 

CWR 301 (LA)   P/D/F Only

Advanced Creative Writing (Poetry)

Paul B. Muldoon 
Monica Y. Youn 

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts.

 

CWR 217 / THR 217 (LA)   P/D/F Only

Exploding Text: Poetry Performance

Robert Holman 

ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.

Exploding Text is a hands-on exploration of spoken word/performance. Like poetry itself, we begin with the oral tradition – Homer, griots of West Africa, Native American traditions: orality not as pre-writing but an equivalent consciousness. We will consider writing as a score for performance, and performance as a tool for editing. We will learn to use recording as a laboratory for writing and digital media as a means of poetic transmission. Hip hop and slam will be touchstones of our work; collaborations with other arts encouraged. Attendance at poetry readings and a final group performance will be part of the curriculum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

PREVIOUSLY OFFERED COURSES:

FALL 2017-2018

SPRING 2017

Radical Poetics, Radical Translation (COM 402/ TRA 402)

Karen R. Emmerich

This course invites students to consider not just what poems mean but how they mean, and how that, how, complicates, challenges, obscures, enlivens, or collides with the task of translation. We will look at forms of poetry that challenge the limits of the translatable, as well as radical translation methods that expand our notion of what translation is. Examples include poems written in made-up languages; unstable texts; homophonic and visual translation; erasure poetics; and multilingual poems. Exploring the places where poetry and translation meet (or diverge), we will put traditional concepts of originality and derivation to the test.

 

Studies in Forms of Poetry- Poetry, History, and Memory  (COM 565 / ENG 544 / FRE 565 / GER 565)

Sandra Bermann, Michael Wood

 

This seminar explores the intricate relations of poetry to history and memory in the troubled 20th century. Individual poets are closely studied for their intrinsic interest but also for their (known and still to be discovered) connections with each other. The poets are Eugenio Montale, César Vallejo, René Char, Paul Celan, Adrienne Rich and Anne Carson, but other writers are called on from time to time. Questions of war and resistance are important, and above all the course attends to what one might think of as the fate of language under pressure.

 

Chinese Literature – Prose and Poetry of the Northern Song  (EAS531)

Anna M. Shields

 

This course surveys Northern Song poetry and prose, focusing on new styles and genres appearing in the 11th century. Genres include: regulated verse; song lyrics; remarks on poetry (shihua); essays; travel writing; funerary texts. Authors include Ouyang Xiu, Mei Yaochen, Su Shi, Huang Tingjian, Yan Shu, Liu Yong, Wang Anshi, Sima Guang. Secondary scholarship in Chinese, Japanese, and English focuses on genres and writers. We consider Song literature in the framework of Chinese literary history, the discursive nature of Song poetry, aesthetics of song lyrics, and new prose styles.

 

Reading Literature: Poetry (ENG 205)

Susan Stewart

An introduction to poetry from the middle ages to the present through close reading of a series of great poems–from medieval songs to Ginsberg’s “Howl”–and their criticism. We will invite living poets to come discuss their favorite poets of the past and we will attend a number of poetry events together.

 

 

Chaucer I: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (ENG 512)

Andrew Cole

In this course we carefully study Geoffrey Chaucer’s poetry and prose collected in the Canterbury Tales. We attend to the literary and historical contexts of the poet’s work; learn about the manuscripts that preserved and canonized his writing from the late fourteenth century on; and read a good deal of secondary criticism on both the poet and his times.

 

American Poetry- American Elegy (ENG 558)

Diana Fuss

This course examines the literary, social, and cultural importance of a body of American mourning poetry that, while immensely popular in its time, remains today largely under-read. Beginning in colonial America and moving through the eras of manifest destiny, world war, and psychoanalysis, we explore a range of personal and public elegies addressing the experiences of dying, loss, and grief, from deathbed to hospital bed, home front to battlefield, bourgeois parlor to rural woods.

 

20th Century French Poetry or Theater- Surrealism (FRE 525)

Efthymia Rentzou

This course examines the development of surrealism from its birth in Dada-infused Paris through its years of exile in New York to its decline after the Second World War. Materials considered include literary and theoretical texts, visual works (including film), and magazines. The course treats the topic at a variety of inter-related levels, exploring surrealism as part of the broad historical phenomenon of the avant-garde, examining its specific ways of (re)conceiving literature and art, and investigating the epistemological ramifications of surrealism’s aesthetic, political, and moral positions. (In English)

 

The Origins of Rome: Livy and Vergil (LAT 108)

Denis Feeney

We will read selections from Livy and Vergil, the masters of prose and poetry respectively in the period of Augustus. Our objectives are: to develop the ability to read Latin with greater ease and enjoyment; to improve sight-reading skills; to experience the artistry of Latin prose and poetry; and to examine some of the questions associated with the Romans’ interpretation of their history.

 

Pushkin and His Time (SLA 413 / RES 413)

Ksana Blank

The course is envisioned as both a language and literature course. Readings and discussion will be in Russian. We will sample writings in many genres (lyric and narrative poetry, short prose, drama).

 

Major Russian Poets and Poetic Movements – Post-Symbolist Poets (SLA 518)

Olga P. Hasty

This seminar is devoted to major writings of Russian poets during the post-Symbolist period up to the Stalinist era. Close readings of selected poetry and prose of Acmeists Akhmatova and Mandel’shtam, Cubo-Futurists Mayakovsky and Khlebnikov, and the unaligned Tsvetaeva and Pasternak serve as points of departure to discuss hallmarks of Russian modernism and issues relating to emigration, art and politics, gender, and the negotiation of novelty and tradition. The art of self-presentation and the act of reading – how they both shape and are shaped by the texts and their authors – is considered over the course of the entire semester.

 

Milton (ENG 325)

Nigel Smith

We will explore John Milton’s entire career, largely as poet, but also as dramatist, prose writer and thinker: a lifelong effort to unite the aims of intellectual, political and literary experimentation. In doing so Milton made himself the most influential non-dramatic poet in the English language. We will spend much time with Paradise Lost, regarded by many as the greatest non-dramatic poem in English or any modern language, and which has extensive debt to drama. We will encounter Milton’s profound, extensive learning and his startling innovations with words, songs and in ideas of personal, domestic and communal liberty.

 

Topics in Renaissance – Erotic Poetry (ENG 328)

Bradin Cormack

This class considers short poems of the 16th and 17th centuries that are variously concerned with love, desire, and sexual intimacy. What are the modes of address in the erotic lyric? How do poems make an erotic subject or erotic object? What is the social or political work of these poems? How might love and rhetoric or love and philosophy be themselves intimates?

 

The Romantic Period- Coming of Age in the Age of Romanticism (ENG 550)

Susan Wolfson

Lively questions of gender, poetic form, genre, narrative logic, literary imagination, socio-historical contexts and reception focus a study of five brilliant projects in Long Romanticism about growing up in the world: Wollstonecraft’s Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792); Wordsworth’s epic poetic autobiography, The Prelude (begun in 1798, pub. 1850), Byron’s Don Juan, published serially from 1819-1824; Austen’s Northanger Abbey (1817, her earliest-drafted, posthumously pub. novel), and some of Browning’s autobiographically coded epic poem Aurora Leigh (1856–the decade of The Prelude).

 

American Literary Traditions – Postwar New York (ENG 555)

Joshua Kotin

This seminar focuses on the literature, art, and culture of postwar New York.

 

Creative Writing – Poetry (CWR 202)

Michael C. Dickman, James Richardson, Susan Wheeler, Monica Y. Youn

Practice in the original composition of poetry supplemented by the reading and analysis of standard works. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student’s growth as both creator and reader of literature. This class is open to beginning and intermediate students by application.

 

Advanced Creative Writing – Poetry (CWR 302)

Paul B. Muldoon, Claudia Rankine

Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts.

 

Life is Short, Art is Really Short (CWR 315)

James Richardson

All literature is short – compared to our lives, anyway – but we’ll be concentrating on poetry and prose at their very shortest. The reading will include proverbs, aphorisms, greguerias, one-line poems, riddles, jokes, fragments, haiku, epigrams and microlyrics. Imagism, contemporary shortists, prose poems, various longer works assembled from small pieces, and possibly even flash fiction. Students will take away from the thrift and edge of these literary microorganisms a new sense of what can be left out of your work and new ideas about how those nebulae of pre-draft in your notebooks might condense into stars and constellations.

 

 

 

FALL 2016-2017

Intermediate Latin: Catullus and His Age (LAT 105)

This course aims at increasing facility in reading Latin prose and poetry and introduces students to the literacy culture of Republican Rome. We shall read selections from two important authors of the late Roman Republic, Caesar and Catullus.

Course Details

 

Creative Writing: Introductory Poetry (CWR 201)

James Richardson, Michael Dickman, Monica Youn, Susan Wheeler, Tracy K. Smith

Practice in the original composition of poetry supplemented by the reading and analysis of standard works. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student’s growth as both creator and reader of literature. This class is open to beginning and intermediate students by application.

Course Details

 

Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry (CWR 301)

Michael Dickman, Susan Wheeler

Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts. Application Required.

Course Details

 

Special Topics in Poetry: Race, Identity, and Innovation (CWR 316/ AAS 336/ AMS 396/ LAO 316)

Monica Youn

This workshop explores the link between racial identity and poetic innovation in work by contemporary poets of color. Experimental or avant-garde poetry in the American literary tradition has often defined itself as “impersonal,” “against expression” or “post-identity.” Unfortunately, this mindset has tended to exclude or downplay poems that engage issues of racial identity. This course explores works where poets of color have treated racial identity as a means to destabilize literary ideals of beauty, mastery and the autonomy of the text while at the same time engaging in poetic practices that subvert conceptions of identity or authenticity. Application Required. (Wednesdays 1:30-3:50 PM).

Course Details

 

Tutto Dante (ITA 304/ MED 304)

Simone Marchesi

This course covers the study of the entirety of Dante’s “Commedia” in connection with Dante’s other poetic and prose works in the vernacular. Highly interactive seminar, taught in Italian. (Thursdays 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM)

Course Details

 

Modern Poetry (ENG 362)

Joshua Kotin and Daniel Braun

This seminar will introduce students to modern Anglophone poetry, with special emphasis on modern American and British poetry. It aims to balance the study of major poets with an investigation of key movements and poetry communities. The seminar will also attend to controversies that defined modern poetry and modernism, more generally–controversies concerning free verse, aesthetic difficulty, elitism, fascism and communism, gender, race, and the role of poetry in public discourse. (Tuesdays and Thursdays 11:00 AM – 12:20 PM).

Course Details

 

Early 17th Century: Polyglot Poetics: Transnationalism, Gender and Literature (ENG 532/ COM 531)

Nigel Smith

On the interaction of different vernacular literatures in early modern Europe in times of turbulent state formation, confessional difference and transcontinental imperial expansion. Through the careers of diplomats, exiles, actors, conquistadors and other travelers, we uncover the deep mutual interest of authors in their neighbors’ writings, a story obscured by emphasis upon classical antiquity’s continuing hold on learning. We consider work in all genres and are particularly concerned with the politics of theater; poetics; prosody; experiment; the attractiveness of translated prose fiction; philosophy and political theory therein. (Tuesdays 1:30 PM – 4:20 PM)

Course Details

 

Special Studies in the 19th Century: Poetry: From Phantasmagoria to Photography (ENG 553)

Isobel Mair Armstrong

This course is about the poetics of the lens and the mirror and their immanent presence in Romantic and Victorian poetry by men and women. The optical culture created by lens-made technologies developed from the late Enlightenment onwards saw the “high” science of the telescope and the microscope migrate to the popular screen images of the phantasmagoria, diorama, panorama, kaleidoscope and a host of optical toys exploiting visual ambiguities. Technologies of the lens and the mirror, from the phantasmagoria to photography, from astronomy to the magic lantern, had repercussions across aesthetics and politics. (Tuesdays 9:00 AM – 11:50 AM)

Course Details

 

Poetics: Modernist Poetics and its Discontents (ENG 563)

Robert Perelman

The disjunction between the poetics and the poetry of the modernist period is striking. The poetics–as articulated in statements by Pound, Stein, Eliot, Williams, Zukofsky, Olson–are fascinating, but they make equivocal guides to the writing itself. Stein’s lecture on <I>Tender Buttons</I> sheds only anecdotal light on that recalcitrant text; Zukofsky’s terse essays on poetry are of little help in reading the linguistic exuberance of his poetry; etc. We read, via exemplary excerpts, both sides of these improbable equations. (Wednesdays 9:00 AM – 11:50 AM).

Course Details

 

SPRING 2016

 

Homer (CLG 108)

Joshua D. Fincher

To learn to read Homer with pleasure. Introduction to Homeric dialect, oral poetry, and meter; discussion of literary technique, historical background to the epics, and Homer’s role in the development of Greek thought.

 

Creative Writing: Poetry (CWR 202)

Michael Dickman, Meghan O’Rourke, James Richardson, Tracy K. Smith, Monica Youn

Practice in the original composition of poetry supplemented by the reading and analysis of standard works. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student’s growth as both creator and reader of literature. This class is open to beginning and intermediate students by application.

 

Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry (CWR 302)

Marie Howe, Paul Muldoon

Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts.

 

Czeslaw Milosz: Poetry, Politics, History (SLA 395/ RES 395)

Irena G. Gross

Polish-American poet Czeslaw Milosz won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1980. In this seminar, which combines textual analyses, history of literature and intellectual history, we will speak on the basis of his major works (and some of his contemporaries – Seamus Heaney, Joseph Brodsky, Derek Walcott), about World War II, Polish-Russian relations, global dominance of English-language poetry, growth of high culture in the United States, and the decline of exile. (Wednesday 1:30-4:20 PM)

 

Dante’s Inferno (ITA 303/ MED 303)

Simone Marchesi

Intensive study of the “Inferno”, with major attention paid to poetic elements such as structure, allegory, narrative technique, and relation to earlier literature, principally the Latin classics. Course conducted in English with highly interactive classes and preceptorials. One precept in Italian will be scheduled on a need-to-be basis. (Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 AM – 12:20 PM)

 

Life is Short, Art is Really Short (CWR 315)

James Richardson

All literature is short – compared to our lives, anyway – but we’ll be concentrating on poetry and prose at their very shortest. The reading will include proverbs, aphorisms, greguerias, one-line poems, riddles, jokes, fragments, haiku, epigrams and microlyrics. Imagism, contemporary shortists, prose poems, various longer works assembled from small pieces, and possibly even flash fiction. Students will take away from the thrift and edge of these literary microorganisms a new sense of what can be left out of your work and new ideas about how those nebulae of pre-draft in your notebooks might condense into stars and constellations. (Thursday 1:30-4:20)

 

Milton (ENG 325)

Russell J. Leo

We will explore John Milton’s entire career, largely as poet, but also as prose writer and thinker: a lifelong effort to unite the aims of intellectual, political and literary experimentation. In doing so Milton made himself the most influential non-dramatic poet in the English language. We will spend much time with Paradise Lost, regarded by many as the greatest non-dramatic poem in English or any modern language; we will encounter Milton’s profound, extensive learning and his startling innovations with words, and in ideas of personal, domestic and communal liberty. (Monday and Wednesday 10:00-10:50 AM).

 

Vergil’s Aeneid (LAT 333)

Yelena Baraz

This course will concentrate on the role of topography and landscape in the poem. Students will be required to participate in a trip to Italy over Spring Break. (Monday and Wednesday 1:30 PM -2:50 PM)

 

Verse in Shows: Poetry on Stage, 405 B.C.E- 2015 A.D. (ENG 384/ THR 338)

Stuart J. Sherman

From Attic tragedies to Broadway musicals, verse forms have been central to the way theater works. Playwrights have deployed them to deliver powerful, sometimes subliminal effects to the ears of audiences well-versed in registering them. In plays ranging from Euripides’ Bakkhai through Elizabethan and Restoration theater to Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton, we’ll look at, and above all listen for, the intricate interactions of verse, prose, and song, trying to work out how they may have operated on their original audiences (whose ears were often in such matters more acute than ours), and how we can make sense of and savor them now. (Tuesday and Thursday 1:30-2:50 PM)

 

Lyric Language and Form II: The Modern Period (COM 422/ ENG 423/ GER 422/ FRE 422)

Claudia Joan Brodsky

This course is the continuation of a 2-semester sequence for undergraduates and graduate students, but may be taken independently of the fall semester course (COM 421). We will focus on reading major poets of the modern period in English, French, German and Spanish with additional readings in the theoretical reflections on modernity, poetry, and the arts written by several of the poets we read. These include: Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Rilke, Celan, Garcia Lorca, Pax, Borges, Stevens, Bishop and Ashbery, among others. Secondary readings will include essays by major theorists and critics. (Monday 1:30-4:20 PM)

 

Classical Arabic Poetry (NES 527/ COM 508)

Lara Harb

This course introduces students to the major Arabic poets and poems from the pre-Islamic period up to and including the Mamluk period. The goal of the course is twofold: to increase the ease with which students are able to read classical Arabic poetry and to expand their knowledge of the various styles, genres and their development. Besides preparing the assigned poems, students are expected each week to put together a brief biographical sketch of the poets we are reading using primary sources exclusively. (This could be done collaboratively) Advanced knowledge of Arabic required. (Wednesday 1:30 – 4:20 PM).

 

French Modernist Poetry (FRE 525)

Efthymia Rentzou

This course investigates Modernist poetics in France from mid-19th to mid-20th c. and seeks to re-evaluate Modernism in French literary history. Course will treat the topic at a variety of interrelated levels by exploring French poetry as part of the broad historical phenomenon of Modernism, while examining the specific ways it materialized in France as formal innovation and as response to modernity. Seminal poets such as Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Apollinaire, and Cendrars, will be discussed as well as specific movements. Readings and theoretical questions will also address the complex relationship between avant-garde and Modernism. (In English) (Wednesday 1:30-4:30 PM)

 

Modern European Fiction & Poetry (COM 559/ FRE 558)

David M. Bellos

A study of 20th century writing in European languages relying to some degree on the principle of constraint or ‘strict form’. Queneau, Calvino, Mathews, Perec, Roubaud and other members of Oulipo will constitute the central focus, but depending on students’ linguistic competences works by e.g., Harig, Kharms, Nabokov, Cortazar may be included. Attention is focussed on underlying principles as well as on practice and product. (Tuesday 1:30-4:20 PM)

 

Poetics: 19thC English and American Poetry: New Tools, New Archives (ENG 563)

Meredith Martin and Meredith McGill

Histories of 19th-C poetry are generally keyed to books and anthologies–breakthrough volumes, collected works, and influential collections. Yet a great deal of this poetry was printed in or supported by the circulation of periodicals, creating dynamic poetic cultures that were provisional, collaborative, and transatlantic. In this course we tackle head-on what the new availability of these resources means for the study of British and American poetry. How might the digitization of magazines, newspapers, and print ephemera change canonical literary histories? (Monday 1:30-4:20 PM)

 

The Evolution of Russian Poetic Form (SLA 512)

Michael A. Wachtel

The course serves as an introduction to Russian verse forms and genres. Considerable attention is given to translations into Russian (and conceivably out of Russian) to understand the qualities of Russian poetry that distinguish it from other European verse traditions (English, German, French, Italian). To some extent exemplary texts are chosen in conjunction with students’ linguistic competencies and interests. (Thursday 1:30-4:20 PM).

 

FALL 2015 

 

20th Century Poetry: Politics, Love, Religion, and Nature (FRS 111)

(Butler College Freshman Seminar)

Neil Rudenstine

This seminar focuses on the work of four major 20th-century poets, placing them in the context of their different eras: W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, W. H. Auden and Robert Frost. There will be weekly background readings that will suggest some of the ways in which the experience of political divisiveness, or impassioned love, or nature, or religious and spiritual values had a powerful effect on the writers we will be studying.

We will spend three weeks on each of the four writers, reading a rich selection of important poems in order to trace how the work and ideas of each poet developed over time. The seminar will be run as an active participatory discussion group. Writing: one modest-size paper on each poet. (Monday 1:30-4:20 p.m.)

 

The Lyric, the Long Poem, and the Sequence: 20th-Century British and Irish Poetry (FRS 137)

(Mathey College Freshman Seminar)

Clair Wills

This seminar will focus on close reading and analysis of a range of 20th-century poetic texts from Britain and Ireland. A major concern will be with the relationship between the lyric, on the one hand, and the long poem, sequence, or linked collection, on the other. What strategies have 20th-century poets used for building larger lyric structures, and what lies behind the impulse to do so? We will consider ways in which poets have attempted to respond to moments of historical crisis — the Irish Civil War, the Spanish Civil War, the Second World War, the Northern Irish Troubles, and environmental disaster — by stretching lyric form towards more open-ended and even “journalistic” and documentary structures. Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon, the Howard G. B. Clark ’21 University Professor in the Humanities and professor of creative writing in the Lewis Center for the Arts, will join us in December for a session focusing on his work. (Tuesday 1:30-4:20 p.m.)

 

Creative Writing: Poetry (CWR 201)

Michael C. Dickman, James Richardson, Tracy K. Smith, Susan Wheeler, Monica Y. Youn

Practice in the original composition of poetry supplemented by the reading and analysis of standard works. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student’s growth as both creator and reader of literature. This class is open to beginning and intermediate students by application.

Course Details

 

Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry (CWR 301)

Paul B. Muldoon, Monica Y. Youn

Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts.

Course Details

 

Reading Literature: Poetry (ENG 205)

Susan A. Stewart, Tuesday 1:30-4:20

This course will introduce students to the art of poetry written, spoken and sung in English over the course of nearly a millennium. Surveying forms as various as ballads and meditations, and writers from anonymous to the Beats, we will consider poetry as a form of beauty and a way of knowing.

Course Details

 

Chaucer (ENG 312)

Andrew Cole, Tuesday and Thursday 3:00-4:20

Look up Geoffrey Chaucer in the Urban Dictionary, and you will find an entry describing him as the original urban dictionary, a “medieval poet” whose Canterbury Tales “is a collection of stories filled with plenty of swearing, slang, and fart jokes.” In this course we will read and discuss that Chaucer–the brilliant, hilarious, dirty poet of the Canterbury Tales. We will enjoy this fun, often moving text while learning about the poet’s artistry, both the literary traditions he so deftly works over, and the sexual, political, and religious issues he so astutely figures and, as is so often the case, perverts.

Course Details

 

Horace (LAT 331)

Denis Feeney, Monday and Wednesday 3:00-4:20

Close reading of selected Odes of Horace, considering his poetic program and techniques, together with the contemporary Augustan context.

Course Details

 

Beowulf (ENG 421 / MED 421)

Sarah M. Anderson, Wednesday 1:30-4:20

How does Beowulf work as a poem? In this course, we aim to find out, learning Beowulf through close study of its manuscript context and of its literary and historical milieux. Topics emphasized include the poem’s genre; its sources, analogues, and afterlives; its place in theories of oral performance; its aesthetics; and its troubled relationship to the culture(s) that wrote it and to the modern cultural investment in it. Tune up your harp, sharpen your wits, and get set to explore a startling and crucial text.

Course Details

 

Lyric Language and Form I (COM 421/ ENG 332)

Claudia Joan Brodsky, Monday 1:30-4:20

Lyric poetry has the uncanny capacity to surprise, and so inscribe itself in the mental life of its reader. This course aims at rendering that inscription indelible by uncovering some of the sources of surprise in the language and form of Renaissance through Romantic lyric works. First of a 2-semester sequence. Second semester on Modern Lyric. Either semester may be taken separately.

Course Details

 

Radical Poetics, Radical Translation (COM402 / TRA402)

Karen R. Emmerich, Wednesday 1:30-4:20

This course invites students to consider not just what poems mean but how they mean and how that complicates, challenges, obscures, enlivens, or collides with the task of translation. We will look at forms of poetry that challenge the limits of the translatable, as well as radical translation methods that expand our notion of what translation is. Examples include poems written in made-up languages; unstable texts; homophonic and visual translation; erasure poetics; and multilingual poems. Exploring the places where poetry and translation meet (or diverge), we will put traditional concepts of originality and derivation to the test.

Course Details

 

Chinese Poetry- The Classic of Poetry (Shijing) (EAS531)

Martin Kern, Monday 1:30-4:20

Through close readings of original sources in classical Chinese, we analyze the Classic of Poetry (Shijing) in its aesthetic, historical, and hermeneutic dimensions from pre-imperial manuscripts through modern scholarship. In addition to reading the actual poetry and its classical commentaries, we discuss in detail its origins of composition and its reception as the master text of early Chinese cultural memory and identity, drawing on the relevant scholarship in Chinese, Japanese, English, and other languages.

Course Details

 

Poetics: Capital and Poetics (ENG 563)

Keston Sutherland, Wednesday 6:00-8:50 PM

In this course we will read Marx’s Capital closely, chapter by chapter, with the aim of mobilizing some of the figures and latent concepts in the critique of political economy for use in thinking about radical poetry and poetics today. We will investigate how far Capital itself and the whole logic of the capital-relation depends on poetic figuration and whether or not Marx proposes a concept of poetry. Alongside Capital we will read work by contemporary poets in English.

Course Details

 

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